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  • How To Cook Ghee?

    How To Cook Ghee?

    The Ayurveda Experience January 18, 2016

    Ghee is made from butter of which the milk solids and impurities have been removed. It is clarified butter.

    Place 2 pounds of organic, unsalted butter in a heavy saucepan on medium heat. 

    Always choose organic to avoid antibiotics, hormones (rGBH), chemical pesticides, etc.  

    Do not cover the pot. When the butter comes to a boil, turn down heat to very low.  Keep cooking until the foam subsides and whitish curds form at the bottom. When the liquid butter turns into a radiant golden tone with a nutty smell, your ghee is done.  Slowly strain the liquid through an extra fine metal strainer and/or a cheese cloth.  Discard the remaining curds and store liquid in glass jars.  Your homemade ghee is done and your kitchen is filled with delicious smell.

    Always use a clean and dry spoon when scooping your ghee. Store ghee in a dry, dark place. And avoid any contact with water. Ghee refrigeration is not needed for 2-3 months, if stored in an airtight container.  When kept in a refrigerator, ghee can last up to a year.  In India, aged ghee is considered to have even more potent healing properties and some families store ghee that is over 100 years old.  Such aged ghee is not consumed.

    Consume 1-2 teaspoons of ghee per day as a supplement, or use ghee in your cooking.  Ghee is one of the best oils for cooking.  It has a very high smoke point (252°C, 485°F) and its chemical structure does not change at high heat.  Ghee produces sweet aroma when heated. You can use much less than of other oils and it enhances the flavor of food.  Individuals with high cholesterol or who suffer from obesity should be cautious in using ghee. The qualities of ghee improve by ageing.

    This article by Jitka Robinson was originally posted on www.jitkarobinson.com

     

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